Ernst
Toller

"A play  which immediately leapt off the page and staged itself in the pit of my unconscious, begging to be translated and revived."

—The Mercurian

Peter Wortsman is the author of two stage plays, Burning Words and The Tattooed Man. He is also the author of two books of short fiction, A Modern Way To Die and Footprints in Wet Cement; a travel memoir, Ghost Dance in Berlin, A Rhapsody in Gray ; a novel, Cold Earth Wanderers; and a work of nonfiction, The Caring Heirs of Dr. Samuel Bard, forthcoming in 2019. His critically acclaimed translations from German into English include works from Robert Musil, Heinrich von Kleist, the Brothers Grimm, and Franz Kafka. Recipient of a 2014 Independent Publishers Book Award, he was a fellow of the Fulbright Foundation, the Thomas J. Watson Foundation, and a Holtzbrinck Fellow at the American Academy in Berlin.

Peter
Wortsman

Softcover, 90 pages
2 Photos,
Dimensions:: 5 '' x 8 ''
ISBN: 978-1-935902-52-2

Suggested Retail $10.95

Release: January 2019



Hinkemann, A Tragedy is the first book of a new series of German and Austrian plays in translation presented by Berlinica Publishing. The series will present authors such as Bert Brecht, Kurt Tucholsky, Karl Kraus, and Walter Hasenclever, but als post-war authors such as Rolf Hochhuth. Ernst Toller’s Hinkemann is the first volume to appear.

Hinkemann


A Tragedy


Written by Ernst Toller

Translated by Peter Wortsman

Ernst Toller was a revolutionary, poet and playwright engagé, president for six days of the short-lived Bavarian Soviet Republic, best known for his Expressionist plays Hoppla! We’re Alive, Man of the Masses and Machine Breakers. In his day Ernst Toller (1893-1939) was as renowned as the young Bertolt Brecht. High profile persona non grata in 1933 when the Nazis came to power, Toller fled to London, went on a lecture tour to the U.S. in 1936, and tried to make a go of it as a screenwriter in Los Angeles. Dispirited, despondent upon learning that his brother and sister had been sent to a concentration camp, and convinced that the world as he knew it had succumbed to the forces of darkness, Toller was found dead by hanging, a presumed suicide, in his room at the Hotel Mayflower on May 22, 1939. Conceived in the German theatrical tradition of Jakob Michael Reinhold Lenz’s The Soldiers and Georg Büchner’s Woyzeck, Toller’s devastating tragedy Hinkemann is a painfully poetic plaidoyer for the overlooked vision and voice of the victim.